Centre for Public Health

Liverpool John Moores University

Public Health Institute - Liverpool John Moores University

World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention

Part of the Liverpool John Moores University

Dr Conan Leavey

Dr Conan Leavey

Senior Lecturer in Public Health/Deputy Chair of the Faculty Research Degrees Committee

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Conan Leavey is a Senior Lecturer in Public Health and Deputy Chair of the Faculty Research Degrees Committee.  The focus of his work is on developing resources for postgraduate students and teaching on BSc Environmental Health and MSc Public Health programmes.  Specialist teaching areas include qualitative research methods, cross-cultural approaches to health and the sociology of the body.  His current research projects involve performers in the UK adult film industry and practitioners of mixed martial arts.

Conan supervises a number of PhD students whose topics include traditional medicine in Saudi Arabia, UK Muslim’s women’s experience of maternity services, home brewing in rural Kenya, and Sexual Entertainment Venues in the UK.  Many of his students use qualitative and participatory methods.   He is a former Associate of the University of Zambia and has worked as a European Union Technical Advisor to the Syrian Ministry of Health.

In addition to the publications listed in the papers section below Conan has also contributed to the following publications:

Lees, C., Akhtar, W., Leavey, C., (2010) The Role of Work Based Learning in Preparation for Advanced Nursing Roles in Primary Care, Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Leavey, C. (2003) The idea of participation in health evaluation and research, in McDonald, T. (ed.) The Social Significance of Health Promotion, London: Routledge.

Leavey, C. and Thomas, P. (1995) Improving Health Promotion in Primary Care: The Health Professional’s Handbook, Institute for Health: Liverpool John Moores University.

Springett, J. and Leavey, (1995) Participatory Action Research: The development of a paradigm, dilemmas and prospects, in Bruce et al. (1995) Research and Change in Community Urban Health, pp. 57-66, Aldershot: Avebury.